Three Dummies in a Dinghy

Three Dummies in a Dinghy is the third instalment of the Stories of Life series.

In it, ordinary Australians share their extraordinary stories of faith and life. Some tales are humourous, others are entertaining and upbeat. But not all are happy stories. Many writers describe how they were found by a loving God in the midst of doubts and great suffering, and the circumstances don’t always get easier. But the message still comes through loud and clear that God is faithful, near and active in the lives of ordinary people.

We discover that there are unsung heroes of all kinds among us. With their encouragement we can open our eyes a little wider, see more clearly, and trust more deeply in the boundless kindness of our Lord.

A Climate of Justice

What does it mean to love our neighbours in a world that is warming?

That is just one of the questions dealt with in A Climate of Justice. Justice, we are reminded, is important to Christians because justice reflects God’s character. There are many issues of justice that currently concern Christians: the refugee crises and the treatment of asylum seekers; the ways in which indigenous people around the world are treated, including the way in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples lag behind non-indigenous Australians.

Dr. Mick Pope examines these and other justice issues through the lens of the Parable of the Good Samaritan, as well as within the context of climate change. What will come as a surprise to many is the role climate change is found to play in addressing these key issues of justice.

On the Third Day

The Easter story culminating in the resurrection of Jesus stands at the heart of Christian faith and celebration. But in the modern world is the story still believable? And does it still have transformative power for modern living? The scriptures contain a mix of attitudes to life after death, and the resurrection stories themselves contain a mysterious mix of the physical and mystical. John Queripel argues that we can no longer hold to a literal understanding of these accounts, but neither can we see the resurrection as merely delusion and wish-fulfilment.